Only One Pair: Protect Workers’ Eyes on the Job

eyesafety

As an employer, you need to promote and enforce the use of eye protection when it is necessary. Educate your workers about the importance of eye protection so they will automatically reach for it before they put their eye health at risk.

Safety glasses provide good protection. They provide even better protection if they properly fit and cared for.

CCOHS (Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety) offers these suggestions regarding the fit and care of your safety glasses.

  • Ensure safety glasses fit properly and are individually assigned and fitted.
  • Wear safety glasses so temples fit comfortably over the ears. The frame should be as close to the face as possible and adequately supported by the bridge of the nose.
  • Clean safety glasses daily and avoid activities that can scratch lenses.
  • Store safety glasses in a clean, dry place to protect them from damage. Keep them in a case when they’re not being worn.
  • Replace safety glasses if they are scratched, pitted, broken, bent or ill-fitting.
  • Replace damaged parts with identical parts from the original manufacturer.

When you need to provide workers with the supplies they need to stay safe on the job, count on Seton. Give us a call at 855-581-1218 or visit http://www.seton.ca and we can help you select the safety products you need.

See Clearly: How to Select and Care for Your Eye Protection

eyeprotection

Because many eye hazards exist in the workplace, it’s important to provide proper eye protection to keep workers safe.

If eye protection is necessary, the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS) suggests establishing an eye safety protection program that includes selection, fit testing, training, maintenance and inspection.

CCOHS offers these tips regarding the fit and care of safety glasses:

Fit of Safety Glasses

Eye size, bridge size and temple length vary from person to person, so safety glasses should be assigned and fitted according to individual needs.

Safety glasses should be worn so that the temples fit comfortably over the wearer’s ears. The frame should be as close to the face as possible and supported by the bridge of the nose.

Care of Safety Glasses

It’s important to properly maintain all personal protective equipment (PPE), including eye protection.  To keep safety glasses in good working condition:

  • Clean safety glasses daily and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Store safety glasses in a clean, dry place to protect them from damage. Keep them in a case when they are not being worn.
  • Replace scratched, pitted, broken, bent or ill-fitting glasses.
  • Replace damaged parts only with identical parts from the original manufacturer to ensure the same safety rating.

Before purchasing any eye protection for your workers, assess their needs so you acquire the most effective protection for their jobs.

When you provide eye protection to your workers, do you provide training on how to effectively use it, and do you communicate how to keep it in good condition?

Eye Protection: Reduce the Risk of Injury

eyeprotection

Eye hazards exist in many areas throughout a workplace. From dust and dirt to more powerful contaminants, there are plenty of ways in which an eye injury can occur. It’s important for workers to do all they can to protect their eyes and preserve their vision when they are on the job.

The Labour Program for Canada suggests working to eliminate eye hazards to effectively prevent them. Some ways to control eye hazards, include:

  • Use protective screens and wire mesh grids to protect yourself from flying particles.
  • Install safety glass guards on machines to prevent injuries caused by flying chips or splashing liquids.
  • Place moveable shields around grinders, lathes and other similar machines to protect other workers.
  • Enclose sources of fine dusts, mists or vapours.
  • Control dust and fumes using general or local ventilation systems.
  • Isolate hazardous operations in separate areas.
  • For outdoor work, damp down work areas and seal dusty surfaces.

Another important way to protect your eyes is to wear proper eye protection. There are several different protective eyewear options:

Safety Glasses: Protect eyes from flying particles of metal, wood, stone, plastic or glass coming from the front only.

Safety Glasses with Semi-Side Shields: Protect eyes from flying particles coming from the front or the side.

Safety Glasses with Eye-Cup and Side Shields: Protect eyes from flying particles coming from the front, side above or below.

Safety Goggles with Regular Ventilation: Protect eyes from dust, sparks and flying particles coming from any direction.

Safety Goggles with Hooded Ventilation: Form a tight seal around eyes to protect from dust, sparks, vapours, splashes and flying particles.

Welding Helmets and Hand-Held Shields: Protect the eyes, face, ears and neck from radiation, sparks and molten metal.

PPE: Your Top 8 Work Wear Must-Haves For Winter

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Winter is already here, and so are darker days and cold, wet weather. This is the time when Canadians are more susceptible to workplace hazards and sickness brought about by some of the toughest weather conditions this country has to offer.

Cold weather can affect mental alertness and manual dexterity, and can lead to accidents such as slips, trips, and falls. Exposure to cold weather can also bring about deadly health risks such as hypothermia and frostbite. All of these things can affect worker productivity and ultimately, the bottom line of your company.

For workers who spend much of their time outdoors, preparation is a must. This means that members of the workforce such as construction workers, road crews, utility workers, fire fighters, and commercial fishermen, to name a few, must use specialized weather-appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and clothing to be able to combat the harsh, cold temperature and still perform their work task safely and properly.

Employers must provide the right PPE that are suitable for the temperature, the task that will be done, and the physical exertion needed to accomplish the task. The PPE should also comply with government standards and regulations. If your workers are exposed to harsh winter conditions, the following PPE items are a must so your employees will be safer, healthier and more productive in winter work environments:

Anti-exposure Work Suits

In extreme cold and wet environments, your employees need an anti-exposure work suit that can protect them from hypothermia. These are waterproof and designed to keep you warm on the boat and in the water. The one-piece overall provides comfort and allows for a full range of motion so you can perform your tasks well.

Rainwear

Rain can aggravate winter cold problems. Employees who work in the rain should wear rain gear that fully covers their body. Rainwear come in three types: water-resistant, waterproof/breathable, and waterproof. Which type to choose depends on how much time you will be spending in the rain and the intensity of your tasks.

Safety Goggles

The eyes are often forgotten when it comes to winter protection. But cold air and wind can quickly dry eyes and  mucous membranes. Goggle help prevent eyes from heat and moisture loss. They also protect your eyes from wind and flying particles, and provide additional face coverage as well.

Winter Gloves

Your hands are your most important tools to perform any task, so it only follows that you should make sure they are protected from the harsh weather. A good pair of warm, insulated work gloves is a necessity when working outdoors in cold climates. You can choose from mittens, ski gloves, neoprene glove and other options to address your cold weather exposure needs.

Boots

Like your hands, you also need to keep your feet warm. Extremities, such as the hands and feet, are most prone to conditions such as frostbite and chilblains. Felt-lined, rubber bottomed, leather-topped boots with removable insoles are best for heavy work in cold weather, but waterproof boots are more suited to tasks that involves walking and standing in water.

trex-6310-ice-traction-device-9464b-lgIce Traction Devices

Traction devices are placed over existing footwear to give extra traction for walking on wet, icy surface, and prevents slip and trip incidents. These are ideal for road construction workers, roofers, installers, deliver person, utility men, among others.

Winter Liners

Use cold weather winter liners to keep the head, neck, and ears warm when wearing a hard hat or other safety head gear. For more severe exposure to cold weather, there are full head covers with openings for the eyes, nostrils, and mouth, and come in flannel, knit, and even neoprene materials.

Work Tents

Wind chill can be dangerous in windy environments. A work tent acts as a temporary shelter for your workers who need to work outdoors, and reduces the length of exposure of workers to deadly wind chill factor.

Working outdoors in the cold is no laughing matter. It can be dangerous to the untrained and to people without adequate winter clothing. But for a well-informed and prepared worker, it can be an enjoyable and fulfilling experience. Wearing winter-appropriate PPE helps make that happen, as well as following these winter safety guidelines to avoid accidents and mishaps in the workplace.

 

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Caring For Safety Eyewear: 5 Must-Do’s

Seton Canada Safety

Just like any other piece of equipment, personal protective equipment and specifically safety eyewear has to be kept in top-notch condition and worn the right way for maximum protection.

You can find all your eye safety solutions here.

 

Five Safety Eyewear Tips

Job Safety Seton

Most industrial eye injuries can be prevented by wearing the right protection.

Here are a couple more eye safety tips…

Wear an eyewear cord that will let the glasses hang around your neck when not in use.

People who wear contact lenses need to be extra careful and wear protective eyewear at all times on a site because dust and other particles can become lodged under the lens and can cause irritations or infections.

You can find all your eye safety solutions here.

Eyewear Safety – Emergency Action For Injuries

Eye Safety
Eyewear safety must always be a top priority.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, construction workers have one of the highest eye injury rates, so it’s important they have the proper eyewear safety equipment.  Wearing the appropriate, well-fitting and comfortable PPE can prevent eye fatigue and headaches and other common and more serious eye injuries caused by the following:

  • Scrap materials, waste, and windblown dust
  • Flying material particles or slivers from wood, metal, plastic, and cement
  • Chemicals or chemical products
  • Falling or misdirected objects
  • UV light from welding torches

Here’s what to do to improve eyewear safety: In case of the following eye injuries or incidents according to the National Eye Institute and other health and safety agencies. Be sure there are clean eye wash stations, eye wash solutions and a first aid kit easily accessible.

Specks in the Eye

  • Do not rub the eye.
  • Flush the eye with large amounts of water.
  • See a doctor if the speck does not wash out or if pain or redness continues.

Cuts, Punctures, and Foreign Objects in the Eye

  • Do not wash out the eye.
  • Do not try to remove a foreign object stuck in the eye.
  • Seek immediate medical attention.

Chemical Burns

  • Immediately flush the eye with water or any drinkable liquid. Open the eye as wide as possible. Continue flushing for at least 15 minutes. For caustic or basic solutions, continue
flushing while on the way to medical care.
  • If a contact lens is in the eye, begin flushing over the lens immediately. Flushing may dislodge the lens.
  • Seek immediate medical attention.

Eyewear SafetyBlows to the Eye

  • Apply a cold compress without pressure, or tape crushed ice in a plastic bag to the forehead and allow it to rest gently on the injured eye.
  • Seek immediate medical attention if pain continues, if vision is reduced, or if blood or discoloration appears in the eye.